Physical Exmination and Vaccines

 Canine Vaccines

There are a variety of vaccines available for dogs. Some are considered core vaccines and other considered non-core vaccines. Core vaccines are always recommended and non-core vaccines depend on lifestyle and risk.

The core vaccines include:

Rabies Virus:
A lethal virus transmitted through bodily fluids such as saliva from other animals such as bats and raccoons.

DHPPV:
Distemper: An often fatal virus that causes vomiting, diarrhea and neurologic issues.
Hepatitis: Can lead to severe damage of the lungs, kidneys and liver.
Parainfluenza:
Can cause infections of the upper respiratory tract.
Parvovirus: A very contagious disease that will cause vomiting and bloody diarrhea.

The non-core vaccines include:

Leptospirosis: An infection of the kidneys from contact with water infected with urine. It can be transmitted to people.

Bordetella: Otherwise known as the kennel cough vaccine. It is a contagious upper respiratory infection that causes a dry hacking cough.

Lyme: A bacterial infection spread from infected ticks. Common in south western Ontario. Can effect joints and other organs.

Feline Vaccines

There are a variety of vaccines available for cats. Some are considered core vaccines and other considered non-core vaccines. Core vaccines are always recommended and non-core vaccines depend on lifestyle.

The core feline vaccines include:

Rabies Virus: A lethal virus transmitted through bodily fluids such as saliva from other animals such as bats and raccoons

FVRCP: Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis: A respiratory infection in cats that causes sneezing, in-appetence and fever.

Calicivirus: An upper respiratory infection that can cause ulcers in the mouth.

Panleukopenia: Can cause vomiting, diarrhea and can be fatal.

The non-core feline vaccines include:

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV): Can be fatal. Decreases the ability of the immune system to respond to infection. Cats regularly in contact with other cats are most at risk.

Frequently asked questions about vaccines

Why do I need to vaccinate?

Preventative vaccines are the best and cheapest protection your pet has against potentially deadly diseases. Many diseases, such as parvovirus spread from infected feces, can live in an environment for months. This means your pet may come into contact with a disease without you ever knowing.

My pet stays indoors, why do they need vaccines?

While we always hope that circumstances won’t change it is best to be prepared. Indoor pets can escape outside or become loose during car rides. They can also come in contact with other animals unexpectedly such as a wild bat coming into your home. A bite from a bat could possibly transmit Rabies.

How often do I need to vaccine my pet?

This questions will depend on your individual pet. We generally recommended yearly boosters during your pets annual physical exam.

How do vaccines work?

Vaccines are a modified or killed version of the virus or bacteria you are trying to prevent. They help develop immunity by harmlessly simulating the real virus so your pets immune system can recognize and fight off the real disease in the future.

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Clinic Hours

Monday: 8 AM to 7 PM
Tuesday: 8 AM to 7 PM
Wednesday: 8 AM to 7 PM
Thursday: 8 AM to 7 PM
Friday: 8 AM to 7 PM
Saturday: 9 AM to 4 PM
Sunday + Stat Holiday: Closed


Address
Bishopgate Animal Hospital
425 Hespeler Road, UNIT #5
Cambridge , ON

Tel: +1 (519) 621 8800 Fax: +1 (519) 621 8807
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